ALOHA Mind Math | Top 10 Math Jobs
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Top 10 Math Jobs

Top 10 Math Jobs

So you do really well in math and reading in school. You have decided to find a career in which you can use your advanced math skills. What could you do with your mathematical skills?  Take a look at these jobs:

Teachers – High School

  • Teach students who are between 13 and 18 years old
  • Work in both private and public schools
  • Use audio-visual aids, computers, lectures, and presentations
  • Work with teenagers, parents, and other teachers
  • Often supervise clubs and sports and social events
  • Training usually takes five to six years after high school
  • Public school teachers need a license
  • Often belong to unions
  • Earn $52,904 – $62,913 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $55,050 – $55,160 per year (national median)

High school teachers teach specific subjects to students who are between 13 and 18 years old. High school teachers use the methods of lecture and presentation to teach subjects such as – English, History, Math, Science or Foreign languages

Mathematicians

  • Usually specialize in theoretical or applied math
  • Theoretical mathematicians study ideas or theories
  • Applied mathematicians use math to solve problems
  • Work alone most of the time
  • May travel to attend conferences or seminars
  • Most have at least a master’s
  • Earn $77,013 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $101,360 per year (national median)

Mathematicians study and research numbers. They create new theories and try to solve problems using those theories. Mathematical work falls into two classes – Theoretical & Applied.

Physicists

  • Study matter and energy
  • Have good research and analytical skills
  • Often specialize in a subfield
  • Are heavy computer users
  • Work alone most of the time
  • Have a doctoral degree
  • Earn $105,195 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $106,840 per year (national median)

Physicists study the properties of matter and energy to gain a better understanding of how things work. Physicists study matter as small as subatomic particles and as large as black holes in the universe. Their research is used to develop new theories, technologies, and products. Physicists do two kinds of research – Basic research & Applied research

Statisticians

  • Usually specialize in theoretical or applied math
  • Theoretical mathematicians study ideas or theories
  • Applied mathematicians use math to solve problems
  • Work alone most of the time
  • May travel to attend conferences or seminars
  • Most have at least a master’s
  • Earn $77,013 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $101,360 per year (national median)

Mathematicians study and research numbers. They create new theories and try to solve problems using those theories. Mathematical work falls into two classes – Theoretical & Applied

Actuaries

  • Use math to calculate odds
  • Often work for insurance companies
  • Mostly work alone
  • Have a bachelor’s degree
  • Take a series of exams over five to ten years
  • Earn $87,032 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $93,680 per year (national median)

Actuaries use math and statistics to calculate the odds that an event will happen. They design insurance programs and pension plans. Actuaries have different duties depending on their specialties – Insurance, Finance, or Employee benefits

Software Developers

  • Work with either computer software or hardware
  • Apply math and computer knowledge to computer design
  • Interact with clients (including training them)
  • May work overtime to meet deadlines
  • Have at least a bachelor’s degree
  • Earn $79,976 – $91,527 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $90,060 – $100,920 per year (national median)

Computer engineers design and test computer hardware and software. Computer engineers are part of a team of workers who develop computer equipment (hardware) and programs (software). They apply their knowledge of math and science to computer design. They help solve technical problems for team members who do the programming or create the equipment. Before starting a project computer engineers talk to clients to find out more about their needs. They also learn about the time line, security needs, and cost limitations. Engineers monitor systems and repair those that are not functioning properly. Hardware and software engineers work together to make sure that the client’s computer hardware can handle the demands of new software. Software and hardware engineers have unique duties.

Geoscientists

  • Geologists study how rocks were formed
  • Geophysicists study the earth’s interior
  • Many specialize in one area
  • Spend time alone performing research
  • Have at least a bachelor’s degree
  • Earn $79,933 – $80,722 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $75,530 – $90,890 per year (national median)

Geologists and geophysicists study the earth. Geologists study the history of the earth. They look at how rocks were formed and how they have changed since they were created. Geophysicists use physics to study the earth’s surface and interior. In addition, they study forces that affect the earth, such as magnetism and gravity. Geologists and geophysicists are sometimes called geoscientists. Other geoscientists include:

  • Engineering geologists provide advice on ways to reduce impact of major projects
  • Geochemists study the chemical elements in the earth and water
  • Volcanologists study volcanoes to predict eruptions
  • Petroleum geologists find ways to drill for fossil fuels
  • Seismologists study earthquakes

 Geologists and geophysicists conduct research to find ways to:

  • Predict atmospheric conditions or earthquakes
  • Increase oil production or find minerals needed for national defense
  • Locate nuclear power plants and storage sites for carbon or nuclear waste
  • Locate sources of heat in the earth that can be used to make electricity
  • Understand how dust from mining or minerals in ground water affects human health

Aerospace Engineering Technicians

  • Help engineers solve technical problems
  • Often assemble prototypes for testing
  • Work in most areas of engineering
  • May work overtime to meet deadlines
  • Work indoors in laboratories, offices, or manufacturing plants
  • Have at least an associate degree
  • Earn $46,900 – $61,460 per year (national median)

Engineering technicians need knowledge in the following areas:

  • Engineering and Technology: Knowledge of how to build machines, buildings, and other things. Also includes knowledge of how to use computers, machines, and tools to do work more usefully.
  • Computers and Electronics: Knowledge of computer hardware and software.
  • English Language: Knowledge of the meaning, spelling, and use of the English language.
  • Mathematics: Knowledge of the rules and uses of numbers. Areas of knowledge include arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and statistics.
  • Mechanical: Knowledge of designing, using, and repairing machines and tools.
  • Production and Processing: Knowledge of how products are made and supplied.
  • Design: Knowledge of making and using plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Customer and Personal Service: Knowledge of providing special services to customers based on their needs.

 Robotics Engineers

  • Design and test robotic parts and systems
  • Have excellent math, science, physics, and computing skills
  • Are creative
  • Sit for long periods of time
  • Many have a master’s degree
  • Need a license
  • Earn $83,295 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $92,030 per year (national median)

Robotics engineers research, design, develop, and test robotic applications. Robots can be used to do jobs such as – assemble electronics, toxic waste clean-up, Bomb disposal, and build cars. Robotics engineers research new ideas for using robots. They design and build robotic prototypes (or models). Using the prototypes, engineers analyze how well the robot works and make adjustments as needed. Depending on the field they work in, robotic engineers may study the human body in order to design robots that copy human movement. Since robots are managed by computers, robotics engineers must be very good at computer science. Often, they write the software program that tells the robot what to do and how to do it. They fix or debug the program if there is a problem. Robotics engineers may develop greener manufacturing processes to get the job done faster and leave less waste.

Civil Engineers

  • Plan and design transportation or water systems or structures
  • Research and analyze data regarding project sites
  • Use computers heavily
  • Usually work in teams
  • Work both indoors and outdoors
  • Often travel to work sites
  • Have at least a bachelor’s degree
  • Have a license
  • Earn $78,755 per year (Illinois median)
  • Earn $79,340 per year (national median)

Civil engineers plan and supervise large construction projects. Civil engineers work on projects such as – roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and water systems. To begin planning a new project, civil engineers gather a lot of data. Civil engineers create and analyze reports, maps, and blueprints. They compute energy use, water flow rates, and grade requirements. They also estimate costs for materials, equipment, and labor. They assess risk and write environmental impact statements if required.

There are more jobs related to math, if you would like to see a full list of jobs that deal with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, click here. For more information on career choices in general click here.

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