Writing doesn't have to be a Struggle - ALOHA Mind Math
2714
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-2714,single-format-standard,qode-listing-1.0.1,qode-social-login-1.0,qode-news-1.0,qode-quick-links-1.0,qode-restaurant-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,hide_top_bar_on_mobile_header,columns-4,qode-theme-ver-16.7,qode-theme-bridge,bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.2,vc_responsive,responsive-menu-slide-left

Writing doesn’t have to be a Struggle

Writing doesn’t have to be a Struggle

One of ALOHA Mind Math’s reading and writing students reflects on her struggles with reading and writing and, in turn, is awarded for her writing twice after receiving assistance.

Reading and writing are the heart of daily communication. The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) reports that high-achieving second grade students will see an average of 18,681 words near the end of the school year, versus struggling readers who will only read 9,975 words. Unless students catch up, each year their academic learning will slow, which could eventually lead to dropping out of high school due to their continued lack of success.

In fourth grade Vaishnavi Kota, came to the ALOHA learning center in Irvine, California, frustrated

with her essay writing results, despite her efforts to make A’s. Her ideas were plentiful, but the challenge for the nine year-old was expressing those ideas. She eventually lost interest and became unmotivated. Her parents were worrisome. Her mother, Rohini, enrolled her in the ALOHA Reading and Writing program at the Irvine location hoping to see some improvement.

After a year of continuous work with ALOHA instructors, Kota’s grades soared from below average C’s to superior A pluses.

“Vaishnavi feels really proud of herself. I see firsthand how ALOHA made a big difference in her confidence, motivation, vocabulary, and writing style. We are thrilled with her transformational achievements and happy we chose ALOHA for her,” said her mother with a smile.

The following year, a poem Vaishnavi penned in the Irvine Police Department’s DARE school program poem competition won her two awards, one by the police department and another selected the best poem among all fifth grades in her school.

“We all are really happy with her success,” said Frany Shah, Director of the ALOHA Irvine Center in Irvine, California.

At ALOHA Mind Math, children in first grade through fifth grade learn curriculum specific to their grade level, state and school district requirements. A sample of their curriculum per grade can be viewed at http://alohamindmath.com/program/reading-writing. Students are assessed before entering a program. In their reading, writing, and language arts programs they begin working with students’ current knowledge and skill level first before introducing advanced curriculum. Their structured program is so motivating that it stimulates and develops a passion for reading and writing.

No Comments

Post A Comment

X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -